IGA-229: Gender, Sex and War – Gender and Public Policy (GAPP) Seminar with Dara Kay Cohen

IGA-229: Gender, Sex and War – The Gender and Public Policy Seminar has been designed by Dara Kay Cohen to give students an opportunity to engage with leading-edge scholars and practitioners working to advance gender equality. Because the subject of “gender and public policy” is too wide ranging and global to address within a single semester, we aim to focus the course each year on a “spotlight” issue.

The spotlight focus for the Fall 2020 semester is gender, sex and war. We will begin with a review of theoretical constructs, then turn to a series of policy relevant questions on the politics and policy of sex, gender, and political violence. Topics will include the causes and consequences of war; wartime sexual violence; the supply of and demand for female members of non-state armed groups; and the regulation of sex and gender within state armed forces. The course will include discussions of research design and implementation, as well as the implications of research on policy responses and interventions. The research will include some U.S. perspectives, but will primarily consider the international dimensions of gender, sex and political violence.

The class meets Tuesdays and Thursdays. On Tuesdays, there will be a mixture of short lectures and participatory activities, including students leading a class discussion of the assigned readings. On Thursdays, students will attend two meetings during the class period. First is the HKS Women and Public Policy Program (WAPPP) research seminar, which is held from 12:00-12:45pm. The research seminars will be hosted by WAPPP and are open to the HKS community; they take place every Thursday for 12 weeks, from September 10-December 3. Guest speakers from the WAPPP seminar will then join our class for the remainder of the class time, where students will have an opportunity to engage with the speakers about their research and career paths. Readings for the Tuesday class sessions will provide background and a broader research perspective on the Thursday presentations. This course is likely to be particularly beneficial to students who are interested in understanding and working to address the gendered causes and consequences of war. Our primary objective is to equip students with a theory-based understanding of gender, sex and political violence, and with a quiver of potential policy interventions. Please contact Prof. Cohen or her faculty assistant Sarah McLain with any questions.

Announcing the Social Innovation & Change Research Seminar Series

The Social Innovation and Change Research Seminar is a venue for researchers of social innovation and social change to present and receive feedback on their research. The seminar is explicitly multi-disciplinary; work may draw on fields as diverse as sociology, political science, psychology, economics, and other social science approaches.

On behalf of the recently launched Social Innovation and Change Initiative at Harvard Kennedy School, we invite you to join our inaugural research seminar.

THE FIRST SEMINAR IS TUESDAY, MARCH 7, 2017, featuring
Maureen Scully, Associate Professor of Management at the University of Massachusetts – Boston
on “Mobilizing the Wealthy: Doing “Privilege Work” and Challenging the Roots of Inequality”
Time: 12:30-2:00pm; Location: 124 Mt. Auburn, Suite 160, Room 105

Summary: Wealthy individuals stand to gain materially from economic inequality, and moreover, have shaped many organizational and societal practices that perpetuate economic
inequality to their advantage. Thus, they are unlikely allies in the effort to remedy economic inequality and indeed likely to contest systematic policies to reduce inequality. In this paper, however, we study the mobilization of a small group of wealthy activists who join allies from lower socioeconomic strata to expose and redress the root causes of wealth consolidation. They offer an instructive alternative to “philanthrocapitalism,” whereby the wealthy present their wealth accumulation as a superior qualification for addressing societal problems and do not address the root causes of how their wealth was amassed. Our study contributes to the growing literature on inequality and organizations, which are the vectors for distributing wages and investment returns, by examining how the wealthy may sometimes wrestle with the sources of their wealth. Advocacy from wealthy allies is unexpected and may jolt attention and change. We derive the concept of “privilege work” from our observations of an often awkward and fraught process that enables the wealthy to engage with their own privilege, use their insider knowledge of wealth accumulation as a lever for change, and work respectfully alongside underprivileged allies. Privilege work represents a new type of ally work along the dimension of socioeconomic class, with potential, even if limited, to disrupt escalating inequality. 

We hope to see you there!

Learn more about the Social Innovation and Change Initiative (SICI ; pronounced “sigh-see”)  and see listing of upcoming seminars at: http://sici-hks.org/

Your Body Chemistry and Professional Status – New Research from HKS MLD Professor Jennifer Lerner

Power and professional status are often associated with myriad environmental factors including education and upbringing, but a new research study provides compelling fresh evidence linking professional status attainment with the interaction of two biological hormones.

“Testosterone, Cortisol and Attained Status” is co-authored by five leading academics in the field of bio-behavioral science, including Harvard Kennedy School (HKS) Professor Jennifer Lerner.

The paper is forthcoming in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.  

Complete story here:  http://www.hks.harvard.edu/news-events/news/articles/body-chemistry-and-professional-status