MLD-802M: Nonprofit Management and Leadership with Arthur Brooks

Arthur Brooks
Arthur Brooks, Professor of the Practice of Public Leadership

Students seeking a broad introductory overview of non-profit management — from historical and legal origins, relationships to government, organizational structure, strategic planning, fundraising and communications, and modes of leadership — will want to enroll in MLD-802M: Nonprofit Management and Leadership with Arthur Brooks.  As President for 11 years of the American Enterprise Institute, and, before that, as a scholar of the non-profit sector at The Maxwell School at Syracuse University, Brooks, now HKS Professor of the Practice of Public Leadership, is uniquely qualified to teach both the academic and practical concepts critical to future leaders of non-profit organizations.

His course is appropriate for students with interests ranging across the sector, from social services, to international aid, to the arts. Featuring guests like HKS pioneering scholar on Public Value, Mark Moore, former NAACP President & CEO Cornell William Brooks, now a professor at HKS, and social entrepreneur Dan Pallotta, this course will draw on proven frameworks and real world examples to provide students an intellectual and practical foundation for further coursework and careers in the sector.

Harvard student can view Arthur Brooks’s detailed Course Preview Video.  In addition to his interest in non-profit management, Brooks writes, speaks, and podcasts on a wide range of topics. Find out more at his personal homepage arthurbrooks.com.

MLD-802M will be taught at HKS in the Fall 2020 semester.  A complementary course in non-profit financial management MLD-427 Managing Financial Resources in Non Profit Organizations with James Honan is offered in the spring 2021 semester. Both courses may be taken for credit.
HKS also offers several other courses in the non-profit and social innovation areas:

MLD-830         Entrepreneurship and Innovation in the Private and Social Sectors with Richard Cavanagh
MLD-831         Entrepreneurship and Innovation in the Private and Social Sectors – Business Plan Workshop with Richard Cavanagh
MLD-836M      Social Entrepreneurship/Social Enterprises 101: How to Go from Start-Up to End Up with James Bildner
MLD-840         Entrepreneurial Finance with Carl Byers

If you have any questions about this course, or any other in the MLD curriculum, email Greg Dorchak, MLD Area Administrator.

 

 

Innovation and Scaling for Impact: A conversation with authors Johanna Mair and Christian Seelos, March 30, 2017

On behalf of the recently launched Social Innovation and Change Initiative at Harvard Kennedy School, we invite you to join an interactive conversation on the new book:

Innovation and Scaling for Impact: A conversation with authors Johanna Mair and Christian Seelos
Thursday, March 30, 4:30 – 5:30PM
Darman Room, Taubman Building, HKS

Join Johanna Mair and Christian Seelos, directors at the Social Innovation and Change Initiative at HKS, for an interactive conversation on their new book, Innovation and Scaling for Impact: How Effective Social Enterprises Do ItRSVP here.

 

 

Learn more about the Social Innovation and Change Initiative (SICI ; pronounced “sigh-see”)  and see listing of upcoming seminars at: http://sici-hks.org/

Announcing the Social Innovation & Change Research Seminar Series

The Social Innovation and Change Research Seminar is a venue for researchers of social innovation and social change to present and receive feedback on their research. The seminar is explicitly multi-disciplinary; work may draw on fields as diverse as sociology, political science, psychology, economics, and other social science approaches.

On behalf of the recently launched Social Innovation and Change Initiative at Harvard Kennedy School, we invite you to join our inaugural research seminar.

THE FIRST SEMINAR IS TUESDAY, MARCH 7, 2017, featuring
Maureen Scully, Associate Professor of Management at the University of Massachusetts – Boston
on “Mobilizing the Wealthy: Doing “Privilege Work” and Challenging the Roots of Inequality”
Time: 12:30-2:00pm; Location: 124 Mt. Auburn, Suite 160, Room 105

Summary: Wealthy individuals stand to gain materially from economic inequality, and moreover, have shaped many organizational and societal practices that perpetuate economic
inequality to their advantage. Thus, they are unlikely allies in the effort to remedy economic inequality and indeed likely to contest systematic policies to reduce inequality. In this paper, however, we study the mobilization of a small group of wealthy activists who join allies from lower socioeconomic strata to expose and redress the root causes of wealth consolidation. They offer an instructive alternative to “philanthrocapitalism,” whereby the wealthy present their wealth accumulation as a superior qualification for addressing societal problems and do not address the root causes of how their wealth was amassed. Our study contributes to the growing literature on inequality and organizations, which are the vectors for distributing wages and investment returns, by examining how the wealthy may sometimes wrestle with the sources of their wealth. Advocacy from wealthy allies is unexpected and may jolt attention and change. We derive the concept of “privilege work” from our observations of an often awkward and fraught process that enables the wealthy to engage with their own privilege, use their insider knowledge of wealth accumulation as a lever for change, and work respectfully alongside underprivileged allies. Privilege work represents a new type of ally work along the dimension of socioeconomic class, with potential, even if limited, to disrupt escalating inequality. 

We hope to see you there!

Learn more about the Social Innovation and Change Initiative (SICI ; pronounced “sigh-see”)  and see listing of upcoming seminars at: http://sici-hks.org/