IGA-229: Gender, Sex and War – Gender and Public Policy (GAPP) Seminar with Dara Kay Cohen

IGA-229: Gender, Sex and War – The Gender and Public Policy Seminar has been designed by Dara Kay Cohen to give students an opportunity to engage with leading-edge scholars and practitioners working to advance gender equality. Because the subject of “gender and public policy” is too wide ranging and global to address within a single semester, we aim to focus the course each year on a “spotlight” issue.

The spotlight focus for the Fall 2020 semester is gender, sex and war. We will begin with a review of theoretical constructs, then turn to a series of policy relevant questions on the politics and policy of sex, gender, and political violence. Topics will include the causes and consequences of war; wartime sexual violence; the supply of and demand for female members of non-state armed groups; and the regulation of sex and gender within state armed forces. The course will include discussions of research design and implementation, as well as the implications of research on policy responses and interventions. The research will include some U.S. perspectives, but will primarily consider the international dimensions of gender, sex and political violence.

The class meets Tuesdays and Thursdays. On Tuesdays, there will be a mixture of short lectures and participatory activities, including students leading a class discussion of the assigned readings. On Thursdays, students will attend two meetings during the class period. First is the HKS Women and Public Policy Program (WAPPP) research seminar, which is held from 12:00-12:45pm. The research seminars will be hosted by WAPPP and are open to the HKS community; they take place every Thursday for 12 weeks, from September 10-December 3. Guest speakers from the WAPPP seminar will then join our class for the remainder of the class time, where students will have an opportunity to engage with the speakers about their research and career paths. Readings for the Tuesday class sessions will provide background and a broader research perspective on the Thursday presentations. This course is likely to be particularly beneficial to students who are interested in understanding and working to address the gendered causes and consequences of war. Our primary objective is to equip students with a theory-based understanding of gender, sex and political violence, and with a quiver of potential policy interventions. Please contact Prof. Cohen or her faculty assistant Sarah McLain with any questions.

MLD-375: Creating Justice in Real Time with Cornell William Brooks (Virtual Class Preview on Aug. 25th)

Join Prof. Cornell William Brooks on Tuesday, August 25th, 2020, for a virtual preview of his fall 2020 class offered at the Harvard Kennedy School, MLD-375: Creating Justice in Real Time. During the class preview, students will have the opportunity to ask questions and review the scope of the social justice issues for the class. Working with select municipal and state governments, students admitted into the course will develop visions, strategies and campaigns as well as legislative, policy, best practice, organizing, communication, and moral framing strategies to address injustices related to police brutality and COVID-19.

Register here for either the 8:00AM or the 4:00PM class previews.

Cornell William Brooks is Hauser Professor of the Practice of Nonprofit Organizations and Professor of the Practice of Public Leadership and Social Justice at the Harvard Kennedy School.  He is also Director of The William Monroe Trotter Collaborative for Social Justice at the School’s Center for Public Leadership. Read more about the Trotter Collaborative and more about Professor Brooks here.

 

MLD-355: Public Narrative with Marshall Ganz — A Leadership Practice Translating Values into Action

According to MLD’s  Marshall Ganz, the Rita E. Hauser Senior Lecturer in Leadership, Organizing, and Civil Society, “To lead is to accept responsibility for enabling others to achieve shared purpose in the face of uncertainty.” But where should a student aspiring to lead for the the greater good begin?  For Ganz, the process of leadership starts with the “self” and builds outward into a constituency, creating “us,” a group that’s ready “now” to meet the challenges on the path to shared goals.  In MLD-355: Public Narrative Ganz and his highly collaborative teaching team introduce students to the discursive process through which individuals, communities, and nations learn to make choices, construct identity, and inspire action. The goal is teaching students to link their our own callings to that of a community that shares a call to action, translating deeply held personal values into effective action. Ganz continues, “Because it engages the ‘head’ and the ‘heart,’ Marshall Ganz's Public Narrative Leadership Pedagogy: Head, Heart, Handsnarrative can instruct and inspire – teaching us not only why we should act, but moving us to act.” Based on a pedagogy of guided reflective practice, students work in groups to learn to tell their own public narrative. Developing their own personal practice of public narrative builds students’ leadership capacity, and is especially critical when they are called to respond in moments of challenge like facing loss, lacking power, confronting inequality and difference, and enacting meaningful change.

Over the years Ganz and his course graduates have introduced public narrative training widely across the globe including in  the Obama presidential campaign (2007-8), Sierra Club, Episcopal Church, United We Dream Movement, the Ahel Organizing Initiative, (Jordan), Serbia on the Move (Belgrade), Avina (Bogata), National Health Service (UK), Peking University (Beijing), Tatua (Kenya), Community Organizing Japan (Tokyo) and elsewhere, proving the relevance of narrative practice across disciplines, professions, and cultures.

Students seeking to extend their narrative practice and learning often follow up MLD-355 in the spring by enrolling in Ganz’s other course MLD-377: Organizing: People, Power, Change, in which put into practice what they’ve learned in organizations, movements, and campaigns of their own.

Beyond HKS, Ganz and graduates of his teaching have established the Leading Change Network, a global community of organizers, educators and researcher aiming ” To meet the challenges to democracy by developing the leadership to organize communities which build power and realize the values of equality, solidarity, and dignity.”

To learn more, view a complete (~75 minute) mini-workshop with Marshall Ganz introducing public narrative pedagogy on the YouTube channel of The Resistance School which was founded in March of 2017 by graduate students of HKS and other Harvard schools. Lesson 1 of the 15 short videos is below; the full set is here.

Well before COVID-19 moved all HKS teaching online, Ganz and his team with HKS Executive Education were pioneering the teaching of leadership and organizing online. With over 7 years experience developing his online public narrative Exec Ed course Ganz and his team have created an exceptionally strong model of experiential, interpersonal, and interdependent learning, which his degree students will enjoy for the first time this Fall.  For a sample of, and in-depth introduction to their pedagogy, view here a (~60 min) video of an online interactive session led by Ganz for Harvard Kennedy School faculty on his approach to online teaching.

MLD-355 and MLD-377 will be offered at the Harvard Kennedy School in Fall of 2020, and Spring of 2021, respectively. For questions about these courses, or any other in the MLD curriculum, email Greg Dorchak, MLD Area Administrator. You may also contact Heather Adelman, Senior Project Coordinator for Marshall Ganz (heather_adelman@hks.harvard.edu).

Building Coalitions to Change Policy and Empower People: The William Monroe Trotter Collaborative for Social Justice

Conceived in 2018, at Harvard Kennedy School’s Center for Public Leadership, the William Monroe Trotter Collaborative for Social Justice advances the social justice and civil rights legacy of William Monroe Trotter. The Trotter collaborative, directed by Cornell William Brooks
fosters research on excellence in social justice and collaboration with local and national level organizations operating in the spheres of public interest and policy, as well as in the areas of community engagement and government. The collaborative conducts and employs applied research that supports efforts to promote advocacy, citizen activism, and impactful, non-partisan policy solutions to civil rights and social justice issues. Through this pedagogy, the Trotter Collaborative meaningfully addresses local and national civil rights challenges.William Monroe Trotter paintingLearn more about the William Monroe Trotter Collaborative by reading here, listening to, or watching, The Avant Guardian podcast, or following the Collaborative’s work in the news.